Just another WordPress.com site

Posts tagged ‘Siddur’

Newest Tech, Oldest Text

The First Paragraph of the Shema as written in...

Image via Wikipedia

“Evyatar” showed up as we were ending Siddur class. I’m not sure what time he expected class to start! Slowly we are adjusting to the new winter schedule. It’s pretty straightforward: All of Morah Elana’s classes start at 3:45 EST. Too bad I had to go and confuse things because I live in Israel, and we switch the clock at a different time. I’m among those who would like to abolish Daylight Savings. But I hear the benefits – my husband says it’s done because of the time by which we need to say the morning Shema prayer. 😉

In Siddur class, we reviewed the idea that the organs in our bodies are very complex. We are so thankful to Hashem that our bodies work the way they are supposed to, so we can live and do everything we need to do in the world, lots of mitzvos. The more science we know, the more we understand the amazing ways Hashem makes the world and how much we have to thank Hashem for.

Elokai Neshama, the next prayer, tells us that our neshama (soul) is tehora (pure). When we wake up each morning we know that Hashem thinks we are good and can make good choices that day. After we hopefully live a lot of years, we die and Hashem takes our neshama all the way back to Hashem. At some time after the moshiach arrives, there will be techiyas hameisim. The people who died will live again. Hashem will return their neshamos into their bodies. At some time after the moshiach arrives, there will be techiyas hameisim. The people who died will live again. Hashem will return their neshamos into their bodies.

“Devorah” mentioned that smoking damages the lungs. We spoke about the mitzva to care for our bodies so that we can live long and do mitzvos. We should not damage our bodies by smoking or using drugs.

In our Book Club, we discussed the story Responsibility, about a Jewish boy who takes care of things at home because his parents are both deaf and mute. discussed One fact we learned about sign language is that words do not always have to be spelled out, but there are hand symbols for different words. A person can choose a symbol to represent his or her name. We used our webcams and the smartboard to try imagining what symbols we might choose to represent our names in sign language.

“Devorah” and “Esti” were a little challenged when it came to sharing space on the board. “Devorah” wanted her boundaries better respected. But at the end of class, she drew a girl standing in the rain, and “Esti” collaborated by drawing an umbrella for the girl in the drawing. 🙂

In Aleph Beis class, Morah Elana explanied that Hebrew is actually a very simple language because all the words sound exactly the way they are spelled. A few students were very surprised that Hebrew is easy – they said it’d difficult! We learned that our wise rabbis from the Gemara teach us that all beginnings are difficult, kol haschalos kashos. But once we learn all the letters and vowels, we will be able to read any word at all in Hebrew with no mistakes!

We were introdiced to the vowel kamatz. We saw how it looks and what sound it makes. We saw examples of the kamatz placed under a letter, and how that changes each letter’s sound.

We continued Peanut Butter and Jelly for Shabbos in Storytime class. Laibel thought it was too hard for the two boys to make all the Shabbos food. Sometimes something seems difficult, but when we try to do it, we see that Hashem helps us and we are able.

Using the board, “Avi”  gave the boys’ mother a bright yellow key to enter her house. “Kobi” drew a baby sister for the boys, all pretty in pink.

Hashem tells us to take care of our bodies – to try to stay healthy. This mitzvah is venishmartem meod lenafshoseichem. Young children should not use a sharp knife. We can help keep ourselves and other people from getting sick by washing our hands with soap and water before we handle food.

Insightful words from Room 613’s principal, Rabbi Yosef Resnick:

 

It strikes me as ironic that we are using the latest in technology to study the oldest text in the world! But then, the Torah has always been ahead of it’s time. So why shouldn’t the methods we use to study it also be? As I occasionally like to remind students, the Torah may seem antiquated to those on “the outside,” but we know that the Torah is actually timeless, and  perhaps might even be described as post-modern

 

Technology,Torah and Teaching

Personal Handy-phone System mobiles and modems...

Image via Wikipedia

I am all ready to start teaching a class at Room 613, with my webcam reinstalled once again and my mic connected, my documents uploaded and my chat box resized to fit my full screen setting. A minute before class, my cell phone rings. It’s Avraham Weiss. “Hello,” he says. “This is Avraham Weiss, your son in law Moishe’s brother in law.”

“Hi Avraham,” I say pleasantly and quickly, the seconds ticking by. “I know it’s you; it says so on my telephone screen.”

“Really?” He has time. This is a great guy who leads a quiet life, who is reported by my daughter to say, “My wife and I enjoy socializing but only with each other.”

“It’s amazing what technology can do nowadays,” he marvels.

I pause and do a double take to my online classroom where my students await my ending this phone call. Amazing. Yeah!

In Aleph Beis Class, we reviewed all the letters in order, and also the sounds each letter makes. Talia was surprised that there is a letter called kaf sofis, but it’s really in the Torah! Not a final chaf, but a final kaf.

We tried naming the letters out of order, and it was a little difficult. But it’s important to know the alef beis out of order, because when we read Hebrew, the words are made of letters in all kinds of orders.

Reading from the Chumash and the Siddur starts with reading the letters. The alef beis is the basis for learning Torah. When we study the Hebrew letters we are learning Torah.

Esti said that she doesn’t know the aleph beis at all. Morah Elana told her that by the end of this class she will not be able to say that anymore!

I found myself emailing my principal the following line, which struck me as rather unique:

Bichlal mai nafka mina if blog dates are approximate? I was asking him in the Aramaic words of the Gemara what difference it makes.

Now does that sound like the typical question a teacher would ask a principal regarding school? 😉

Read my Recent Posts and Archives , located at the upper right of this page.